Auburn University Exposed for Decades of Deadly Kitten Experiments

At Auburn University, a longstanding practice of breeding and testing on sick kittens has recently come to light, raising significant ethical questions and public concern.

From the extent of the experiments to the funding behind them, and the broader implications for animal welfare and scientific research, this is a complex and sensitive issue.

Auburn University reportedly has a breeding colony specifically testing on kittens.

Photo: Pexels
Auburn University reportedly has a breeding colony specifically for testing on kittens.

Decades of Controversial Research

For nearly 50 years, Auburn University has been involved in breeding thousands of kittens with genetic disorders to be used in a variety of experiments, One Green Planet reports. These disorders include symptoms such as loss of muscle control, vision loss, and early death.

The White Coat Waste Project, an organization focused on ending taxpayer-funded animal testing, has highlighted the severity of these experiments, which include overfeeding to induce obesity and diabetes, infecting with viruses, and administering experimental drugs.

Many animals are euthanized after enduring severe suffering.

Photo: Pexels
Many animals are euthanized after enduring severe suffering.

Funded by Taxpayer Dollars

The experiments at Auburn are not only concerning due to their nature but also because they are funded by taxpayer dollars through federal agencies like the NIH, NSF, and USDA, as maintained in a letter from members of congress. This revelation has sparked a debate on the ethical use of public funds for research involving significant animal suffering.

Regulatory Scrutiny and Legal Battles

Auburn’s practices have not gone unnoticed by regulatory bodies. The university’s animal labs have been cited for multiple violations of federal animal welfare laws, including inadequate care and untrained personnel conducting euthanasia, according to a report by the White Coat Waste Project.

Despite these violations, Auburn and the Smithsonian Institution, which is also involved, have resisted releasing detailed records of the experiments, leading to ongoing legal challenges for transparency, reports PETA.

Alternatives to animal testing exist but are underutilized.

Photo: Pexels
Alternatives to animal testing exist but are underutilized.

Shifting Perspectives on Animal Testing

The controversy at Auburn University is part of a larger conversation about the ethics of animal testing, especially in cases where the research involves significant suffering. The USDA’s recent decision to end research experiments on cats, driven by public and legislative pressure, reflects a growing consensus against certain types of animal testing,

CNBC reports. This shift is supported by bipartisan efforts in Congress, such as the KITTEN Act, aimed at ending harmful animal research practices.

Ethical concerns are raised over the use of public funds for these tests.

Photo: Pexels
Ethical concerns are raised over the use of public funds for these tests.

Looking Forward

The situation at Auburn University underscores the need for a critical reassessment of animal testing, particularly when it involves significant suffering and is funded by public money. The call for transparency, stricter regulatory oversight, and the exploration of alternative research methods is growing louder.

As we move forward, it is crucial to balance scientific inquiry with ethical considerations, ensuring that the pursuit of knowledge does not come at the expense of those who cannot speak for themselves.

Click below and tell Auburn University to end its legacy of harmful and unnecessary testing!

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Matthew Russell is a West Michigan native and with a background in journalism, data analysis, cartography and design thinking. He likes to learn new things and solve old problems whenever possible, and enjoys bicycling, spending time with his daughters, and coffee.
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