Are dogs myopic?

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A common concern among dog owners is how well their canine friends can see, and what exactly they are able to visualize. It’s a fact that dogs are mostly colorblind, due to the high percentage of rods in their eyes that detect both black and white. In comparison, a person’s eyes are made up of cones that can detect color. Dogs are not completely colorblind, however, as they do have some cones in their eyes that allow for mostly blue and red color sensitivity.

In terms of field of vision and myopia, otherwise referred to as nearsightedness, it’s not completely clear how well dogs can see when an object is in their central field of vision. Dogs have a much wider field of vision than humans, comfortably seeing about 240 degrees without moving their head. This is due to the placement of dogs’ eyes on the side of their head, instead of on the front, as in the case of humans.

A dog’s central vision, or what they are able to see directly in front of them, is limited due to this wide field of vision. It’s most likely that dogs have some level of nearsightedness, especially when placed in comparison to people and their own peripheral vision.

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