Police Officer Acts Quickly To Rescue 2 Five-Week-Old Puppies Locked In Sweltering Hot Car

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Police Officer Robin Gander discovered two five-week-old puppies locked inside a hot car in a Planet Fitness parking lot in Rock Hill, North Carolina.

Temperatures soared to 94 degrees Fahrenheit that day, and were much hotter than that inside the car. Officer Gander knew she had to act quickly if she wanted to save these poor pups. She managed to fit her arm inside one of the windows to grab the puppies.

Twitter/@GSuskinWSOC9

Twitter/@GSuskinWSOC9

She said they were hot to the touch, crying, and panting heavily. She quickly grabbed her lunch cooler and put the two pups inside so they could lay on her ice packs. She blasted the air conditioning in her patrol car and put the pups in front of it to help cool them down as quickly as possible.

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The owner of the puppies, Latoya Reid, was arrested and charged with ill treatment of animals. She claimed that someone was coming there to meet her and buy the puppies, but she was getting her hair done that whole time. Officer Gander waited there with Reid for 45 minutes, but no one ever came to buy the pups.

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wbtv

Both pups are under the care of Animal Control while the court case is still pending. Once it’s complete, the puppies will be put up for adoption.

If it weren’t for Officer Gander’s quick thinking, these pups would have died in that hot car.

Twitter/@GSuskinWSOC9

Twitter/@GSuskinWSOC9

Temperatures can rise extremely quickly in cars, and it can be deadly to leave dogs inside. Dogs should never be left in them, no matter how quick you’re going to be.

According to the Humane Society, when it’s 72 degrees Fahrenheit outside, the temperature inside your car can heat up to 116 degrees within an hour. When it’s 80 degrees outside, the temperature in your car can reach 99 degrees within 10 minutes. Even rolling down a window has been shown to have little effect on the temperature inside a car. Even if you are only going to be gone a few minutes, the safest thing to do is to NOT leave your dog in the car.

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Growing up, Ashley always had a passion for writing. After receiving her Bachelor's in Journalism from Stony Brook University, she now uses that passion to write about the thing she loves most in this world: animals! When she isn't writing, you can find her curled up on the couch with a kindle in her hands and her Guinea Pigs on her lap.