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I adopted two rescue dogs: part 2

Doggie_birthdayWe had Charlie Brown just seven months, when I received an email from the foster mom and rescue agency.  The email was also sent to all of the other people who had adopted the puppies from the litter dubbed “Kate Plus Eight”.

The runt of the litter, originally named mini-Cooper, and then known as “Fluff”, was being returned to the rescue agency.  He had sustained an inoperable injury to his right, front leg, which would require amputation.  Did any of us want to adopt a brother?

Not considering that option for a moment, I re-wrote the email in my own words and broadcast it to my friends by email, Facebook and Twitter.  The number of individuals who wrote back to me and said “YOU must adopt him!” was astonishing.  People who knew me, but did not know each other, were all replying with the same response.  I casually mentioned this to my partner, who was already concerned about the stress I was under raising Mr. Pack Leader (Charlie Brown)!!  “Can you imagine if there were TWO of these?”, he asked, and pointed to Charlie who was bouncing around in his early-morning shenanigans.  I laughed.  I had never lived with more than two dogs at a time before.  I would be crazy to do this, right?

Knowing that I was, indeed, crazy, a few days later, I filled out the application to adopt “Fluff”, whose name had already been changed back to Cooper (pictured).  His original adoptive family had named him Fluff because their other dog is named Peanut Butter.  Peanut butter and marshmallow “Fluff” is a popular sandwich here in New England where Marshmallow Fluff was invented and is still produced to this day.  Cute!  The family were unable to afford the medical expenses necessary to either treat, or amputate, Cooper’s leg which sustained an injury mysteriously, as no one has ever been sure exactly what happened.  Because the injury had been sustained some weeks prior, and he had been confined to a crate in a well-meaning attempt at rehabilitation, the leg could, unfortunately, not be saved.  We were not the owners of record, nor was the original family — Great Dog Rescue owned Cooper, and they made the (right) decision to go for amputation.  Experimental surgery was an additional, non-guaranteed, and expensive option.  As the vet so eloquently put it, “I wouldn’t put my own dog through that.”  The amputation was scheduled, and we donated some of the money to rescue to help pay for the surgery.

Cooper, who was with his foster mom during surgery and recovery, bounced back from surgery within a day or two.  The most difficult part was keeping this young puppy from jumping around too much while healing.  The first thing he did when he got back to their home was jump up on the humans’ bed!

Cooper stayed with the foster family for about two weeks, until his stitches were removed and he was fully recovered from surgery.  We had visited him before the amputation, and brought Charlie with us to be sure they still got along (they are thick as thieves).  I later learned that Charlie and Cooper were the last two remaining dogs to be adopted out the first time — even their mother, Kate, was adopted out before them.  So, they were more or less a bonded pair.  I often think it took all of this for them to find their way back to each other.

I brought Cooper home in late August of 2012, almost exactly one year to the day from the day Hector died so suddenly a year before.  There often are times that Cooper reminds me so much of Hector.  His demeanor, his cuddliness, his gentle presence in the room.  He even sits in the same favorite spots as Hector did.  If you believe in reincarnation, you might think maybe Cooper is Hector, reincarnated.  Sometimes, I like to think so.

Cooper is an amazing creature.  He does not appear to be “disabled” in any way, shape or form.  He can often run circles around his brother, quite literally.  He jumps into and out of the car, and onto and off furniture, like a champ.  He likes to run on the beach.  People who meet him for the first time usually don’t notice his missing leg for several minutes.  He has an active and full life.  He adores his “uncle” Hobie, now almost 15, and all of the cats.

As we approach the boys’ third birthday, they really have turned out to be “great dogs”!  We have stayed in touch with the Great Dog Rescue volunteers, our foster mom, and most of the other adoptive pet-parents of Kate and her babies.  We got together on November 11th 2012 and 2013 (which just so happens to be a holiday!) with some of the other pet parents to celebrate the kids’ birthdays on the beach in Gloucester, Massachusetts.  We’re not sure if we’ll be able to swing that again this year, but we will celebrate our good fortune on 11-11-14, for sure.

Earlier this year, yet another of the boys’ siblings was returned to rescue due to the medical situation of one of his adoptive parents.  I thought about adopting Franklin for about five minutes.  Somebody beat us to it.

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