These 5 Simple Steps Could Help You And Your Pet Survive A Hurricane

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Natural disasters don’t let us know when they’re coming, and when they do arrive, the results are often devastating.

Rescue efforts are often swift to arrive but overwhelmed with work. As we have seen all too many times before, pets as well as humans are at risk in these massive weather events. Although Hurricane Harvey landed on August 25, rebuilding efforts in southeastern Texas have yet to begin in earnest, as the waters have not even fully receded. Because of this, some animals have been stranded for weeks.

There’s no best way to avoid a natural disaster, but you can be ready when one strikes. Having a reliable contingency plan of action as soon as the first raindrops fall is always better than not having a plan at all.

Source: Pexels

Source: Pexels

Keep this checklist handy, and both you and your furry friends will be able to weather the storm in safety.

5. Be ready to leave

In the event of a natural disaster like a hurricane or tropical storm, you and your pet need to be ready to evacuate immediately. Along with a pet carrier and a leash, you should make sure your pet is microchipped and that your information with the manufacturer is up to date, the CDC maintains.

You can familiarize your animal with the carrier, and the experience, by practicing on a few longer rides. The traffic is often very heavy when entire cities are asked to evacuate.

Source: Pexels

Source: Pexels

4. Pack a bag

Don’t worry about your swimwear. Food, water, and safety should be your main concerns when you put together an emergency bag. It doesn’t even have to be pretty, so long as it’s easily portable.

Waterside Kennels Mysteries lists extra kibble, leashes, collars, and basic first-aid supplies as essential items in your bag. Depending on the nature of the storm and the traveling ahead, it may be worthwhile to pack camping supplies like a tarp, rope, flashlight, and bungee cords.

Source: Pexels

Source: Pexels

3. Have a place to stay

While it’s always ideal to have accommodating relatives in drier climates, sometimes people leaving disaster areas do not have that option. Hotel or motel bills can add up after indeterminate weeks, while shelters are available but provide little privacy. But both options may be preferred to potentially being washed away at home. When you’re bringing an animal along, you should also find out if your destination is pet-friendly, as Irresistible Pets maintains some relief shelters will turn animals away at the door.

Those who live in disaster-prone areas should decide where they will go before it’s too late. Finding shelter becomes difficult as massive weather events progress and thousands of others seek the same. According to the CDC, arrangements should be made with a neighbor or local friend or family member if you do not have a car.

Source: Pexels

Source: Pexels

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Matthew Russell is a West Michigan native and with a background in journalism, data analysis, cartography and design thinking. He likes to learn new things and solve old problems whenever possible, and enjoys bicycling, going to the dog park, spending time with his daughter, and coffee. Find more about Matthew on his personal website.